Cultural Differences: Sexualised Business Fashion In East vs West Cultures

Sexualized Fashion  On Australian Teenagers

In Australia, Sydney, I picked up a few fashion pointers that highlighted more differences between Eastern and Western fashion culture.

I noticed a bunch of young girls with their moms, posing around a tree, taking photos in cute dresses that made them look more mature.

I thought, “You would not get that in China.”

In China, almost every single teenage female until their mid-30’s wears either short denim shorts or a very short skirt to show off all the beautiful, natural assets on their body.

Kids and teenagers are mostly the ones who wear sexualised fashion in Australia.  It would be rare to see a thirty-year old Australian woman with high-cut denim shorts eager to show off her booty.

 

Job Prospects And Fashion Culture In China And Australia

In Australia, I also noticed the fashion sense of women in their twenties and upward dress more in conservative business attire.

The cultural reasons behind such conservative fashion in Australia are connected to work.


Right now, Australian girls are walking around dressed in black pants and black tops.  Everything is just work-related.

I gazed one Australian woman with a button-up shirt where the midsection opened up in a triangular shape to show off her bellybutton.

That is as risqué as people in Australia become.  Your workplace in Australia would deem that sexualised outfits are not appropriate for the Australian workplace.

Whereas in China, any attire is business attire.  The hotter and sexier a woman looks, the likelier it is that she will get a job.

What Business Attire Is Appropriate In Your Culture?

This trend was no more obvious than when I was walking around in Sydney and saw an Asian girl dressed in a short, sexy, black skirt, a black jacket top on, and a little backpack on her back.  All her clothes were very tight, showing off her ass and legs.

I thought, “That is the kind of interview uniform you would use in China to show off to the male bosses, and get yourself a better chance at securing a job.”

But an Australian boss would probably look at that interview outfit, point to the other employees in the workplace, and say, “That is more appropriate business attire than what you are wearing now.”

In Australia, you would straight-out get rejected for wearing sexualised clothes to a work interview.

Dressing To Impress In Australia

That brings me back to the phenomenon of how in Australia, sexualised clothes are worn between 13-18 years old, whereas in China, because those clothes are culturally acceptable in the workplace, Chinese women wear sexualised clothes into their late thirties.

It paints a picture, because I have seen young Australian girls between 13-18 years old wear sexualised fashion that one would also see in China on the same age bracket.  However, once the Australian girl reaches an employable age, sexualised outfits are replaced with more conservative clothes.



I think this trend from sexualised attire to business attire at the age of 18 happens in Australia because females who work no longer have time to walk around looking sexy and trying to pick up boys with their girlfriends.

The intent from 18 year old Australian girls matures to a mentality where they dress to impress for work.

The Evolution Of Australian Fashion Culture

As Australian females wear more mature clothes, they come across more mature choices.  The boys that they pick up will also be ones that have a job and work, and therefore, the whole fashion landscape in Australia evolves.

Employed Australian girls focus more on makeup and beauty, rather than just showing off their sexy bodies.

In a way it is disappointing to see so many Australian females covering their bodies up, because sexualised fashion looks very sexy in China.

I guess that is why Australians love the beach.  Australian beaches are a good place to see where all those mature Australian curves have hidden.

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Author: 钨宝

The author of Diary Of A Mad Chaos from 1996 to 2018, The Lost Years book, Wubao In China (猎艳奇缘) book series, and Foreigner (华人) an exploration of race relations in Australia. Fluent in Chinese Mandarin, Macedonian, and English, the author currently resides in China, Guangzhou where he continues to make comparative analysis of the cultural differences between Eastern and Western societies.

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