The West Stole The Blue Skies

Sometimes when I walk through China on polluted days like this, I remember in Australia how crystal clear and blue the sunny skies are there.

It makes me wonder, do Chinese people even know what a beautiful day looks like?


Because, if you walk around in smog every single day, and you were born into that world, then you are always going to believe that there are never blue skies, that it is some fantasy that can only be experienced somewhere else in the world.

For me, I experienced it every single day before I came to China.

So to come to China, and experience smog every single day, is a wake-up call.

China Choked With Pollution

I always remember the times I fly overseas into China, across the vast blue ocean, where the skies are mighty and clear.  However, once you arrive to the maritime boundaries of China, you suddenly dive into an endless stream of grey clouds choked with pollution.  When you land, you realize that it will never go away.

I used to think, “It must be a winter day.”  But dozens of trips into China proved, it was always a nuclear winter day.

In the eyes of a Chinese who has never left their country, it must just be natural for them.  They must all believe that this is the way the earth looks.

But, when they step out of the fog and the mist and the pollution, then they are going to realize that the world is a better place.

The Crisis Of Pollution

I live in Guangzhou, but I have also lived in Beijing.  It is hard to understand why people would want to live there in those conditions on a daily basis.

The pollution there is like shredding thousands of mosquitoes into dust, letting them fester for a week, crushing them into soot, and then blowing them relentlessly through an air conditioner directly into your mouth and windpipe nonstop.

It amazes me what little is done about this problem in China.

If people were dying in Australia from pollution, I am sure the Australian government would stop the production, stop the deaths, and stop the pollution.

Sadly, it seems that money is what makes the Chinese economy go around, and it comes at the expense of the Chinese people.



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Author: 钨宝

The author of Diary Of A Mad Chaos from 1996 to 2018, The Lost Years book, Wubao In China (猎艳奇缘) book series, and Foreigner (华人) an exploration of race relations in Australia. Fluent in Chinese Mandarin, Macedonian, and English, the author currently resides in China, Guangzhou where he continues to make comparative analysis of the cultural differences between Eastern and Western societies.

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